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FAQ10: Are there any exercises for practicing with the Servox Inton?

Practicing speaking with the SERVOX Inton.

Place the instrument against your neck and try to say the vowels "a, e, i, o, u."

Was each sound understandable to a family member?

Now say the following short phrases:

I am ok Are you ready?
Are you ok? Going up
No, not now Going out
One cup of tea Getting up
We will come Good-bye

The following are some sentences, which will help you to practice producing various speech sounds with the SERVOX Inton. Careful articulation and exaggerated lip and mouth movements will help you to produce them clearly and distinctly.

I can say chop I can say shop
I can say cherry I can say sherry
I can say church I can say birch
I can say chip I can say ship
I can say check I can say heck
I can say cheek I can say sheik
I can say chilly I can say silly
I can say choke I can say poke
I can say cheap I can say sheep
I can say street I can say fleet
I can say clock I can say block
I can say steak I can say flake
I can say stick I can say flick
I can say stuck I can say tuck
I can say chick I can say pick
I can say stock I can say block
I can say speech I can say peach


Using Intonation with the SERVOX Inton

Once you have become comfortable using the SERVOX Inton, you may want to try utilizing its intonation capability.

Intonation is an inclusive term, in that it refers to variation of pitch as a function of time. It may be applied to single inflection or to long-term variation that extends over numerous inflections and shifts.

Stress refers to relative vocal prominence and is a combined effect of duration, pitch and intensity. Evidence has shown that a stressed word may be longer in duration, reach a higher pitch, exhibit wider inflection and have a higher general pitch.

Prosody is the various inflection patterns of speech or the 'speech melody'.

The basic pitch of the SERVOX Inton is produced by depressing the upper control button. To produce the second, higher pitch for intonation purposes, you must depress both buttons simultaneously*, during the word or syllable you wish to stress. This can be done by either using the index and middle fingers to operate the control buttons, or by using a Îrocking' motion of the thumb from one switch to the other.

Practice by saying the following sentences in three different ways (depress the lower button only on the underlined word):

I want a cup of tea

I want a cup of tea

I want a cup of tea

Remember to release the lower button immediately at the end of the stressed word, while keeping the first button depressed to finish the sentence. If the stressed word is the last word in the sentence, be sure to release both buttons simultaneously.

We want to go

We want to go

We want to go

*An alternative way to use the intonation capability is to depress the lower button, while releasing the top button. The lower button produces a pitch ¸ of a tone higher than the top button. The top button does not need to be kept depressed for the change of pitch to occur

Intonation Practice Materials

Read the following sentences, concentrating on the prosody:

When is your birthday?

My birthday is tomorrow!

My birthday is in January.

Is the trail bumpy?

The trail is bumpy!

Don't take the bumpy trail.

Simple declarative and imperative (statement) sentences ordinarily take downward intonations. Be sure to exaggerate as you read the following sentences:

That's not the way Turn around

They saw Peter Turn back

That was today Bring me the paper

She'll find out Get me a check

I won't tell you Start

Feed the cat at eight

The SERVOX Inton can be professionally adjusted to provide for automatic downward intonation (i.e a gradual downward pitch change when the operating button remains depressed). If you would like this feature, contact your speech professional or the dispenser from whom you purchased your SERVOX Inton.

Questions answered with a "yes" or a "no" usually take an upward intonation.

Exaggerate as you read:

Coming, Bob? Are you ready?

Can we count on them? Did Jack say so?

Can't you see it? Will you leave soon?

Is that all? Did they arrive?

Do you think so? Did you see them?

Was Jack there?

Questions which cannot be answered with "yes" or "no" usually take downward intonation.

Exaggerate as you read:

How many dollars? How did you know that?

How much did it cost? Why not say so?

What is the date? Where are you going?

When did they leave it? Who's that?

Why won't you tell me?

In each of the following sentences a statement is followed by a question. The intonation in each question specifies the implication of the entire sentence. With upward inflection, the sentence is a general request for information; with a downward inflection, the listener would be asked to confirm or deny the statement.

Try various intonation and stress patterns on these statements:

She doesn't need five dollars, does she? (upward)

She doesn't need five dollars, does she? (downward)

He isn't painting the house, is he? (upward)

He isn't painting the house, is he? (downward)

Jeff didn't steal the book, did he? (upward)

Jeff didn't steal the book, did he? (downward)

It won't cost me fifty dollars, will it? (upward)

It won't cost me fifty dollars, will it? (downward)

You are going to Europe, aren't you? (upward)

You are going to Europe, aren't you? (downward)


In each of the following, the listener is presented with alternatives. If the final intonation is upward, he is asked for an inclusive "yes" or "no". If it is downward, he must make a choice. Practice with the following phrases:

Are you going to Hawaii (upward) or to the beach (upward)?
Would you buy a Cadillac (upward) or a Ford (upward)?

Are you going to Hawaii (upward) or to the beach (downward)?
Would you buy a Cadillac (upward) or a Ford (downward)?

Would you be here (upward) or there (upward)?
He can cook (upward), can't he (upward)?

Would you be here (upward) or there (downward)?
He can cook (upward), can't he (downward)?

To practice stress or emphasis:

Come here They left two hours ago

Come here They left two hours ago

They lived in a white house My son's car needs repairs

They lived in a white house My son's car needs repairs

They are baking a cake He bought a used car

They are baking a cake He bought a used car

His back was injured His back was injured



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